Right On, JPQ!

Jason Parker Quinton: Writer, Entertainer, Web Presence

excdus:

Aldo Chaparro

It’s not how old you are, but how you are old.

excdus:

Aldo Chaparro

It’s not how old you are, but how you are old.

(via stabbingrobot)

New Thrasher cover.
Instant classic.
welovekanyewest:

Kanye on water bottles

This is why it is lame when Kanye raps about trappings of excessive luxury. Such materialism is an important part of hip hop, the subject matter beyond kosher, but he has been at conspicuously trying to be the best for too long to ask us to try and buy that shit.
Twitter as the invisible monologue and narrator of the self makes a rap god too real. 
"My G6 fly with a Grey Goose waterfall."
If you are going to install a vodka waterfall in a personal aircraft, you might as well aim for the top shelf stuff.
Also, Kanye considers recycling and hydration a responsibility, cut to that whole bit on “Dr. Carter” where Lil Wayne discussing the toping of his “Recycling” “enlightening” and “Dr Kanye West is one of the brightest.”

welovekanyewest:

Kanye on water bottles

This is why it is lame when Kanye raps about trappings of excessive luxury. Such materialism is an important part of hip hop, the subject matter beyond kosher, but he has been at conspicuously trying to be the best for too long to ask us to try and buy that shit.

Twitter as the invisible monologue and narrator of the self makes a rap god too real. 

"My G6 fly with a Grey Goose waterfall."

If you are going to install a vodka waterfall in a personal aircraft, you might as well aim for the top shelf stuff.

Also, Kanye considers recycling and hydration a responsibility, cut to that whole bit on “Dr. Carter” where Lil Wayne discussing the toping of his “Recycling” “enlightening” and “Dr Kanye West is one of the brightest.”

(via onehandedabortionisttwerker)

I am not googling “how to get better at tagging?” #learning #following #futureitboy #it #tag
vicemag:


I think the fact that you are so marketable is that you’re one of the few rappers to bridge the gap from being just a rapper to being a pop culture icon. Let’s put it this way: my mother knows who you are. You even became a meme. How’d that come to be?It’s probably because I talked to Bill O’ Reilly and asked him if he was mad. It was nothing really. He was trying to come at me and I thought it was hilarious, so I made a joke out of it. It’s a lot of things. But the simple fact is that I’m living my lifestyle and people are capitalizing on it financially or intellectually. I don’t plan any of this, I just wake up in the morning being me.

—We interviewed Cam’ron

vicemag:

I think the fact that you are so marketable is that you’re one of the few rappers to bridge the gap from being just a rapper to being a pop culture icon. Let’s put it this way: my mother knows who you are. You even became a meme. How’d that come to be?
It’s probably because I talked to Bill O’ Reilly and asked him if he was mad. It was nothing really. He was trying to come at me and I thought it was hilarious, so I made a joke out of it. It’s a lot of things. But the simple fact is that I’m living my lifestyle and people are capitalizing on it financially or intellectually. I don’t plan any of this, I just wake up in the morning being me.

—We interviewed Cam’ron

(via noiseymusic)

Much ballyhoo is blogged and bluffed about Wes Anderson’s design. You have to say “design” like you are saying “Venus,” or “ethereal” to prove that you really read that one book. Anderson’s des-aye-enne, his writing, and his tonal style seem to get the most praise from the nascent Netflix and mkv. Cinephiles who were as lucky to get blessed with Wes as hip Americans were to get the Coens & Quentin & Jarmusch & Lynch & Linklater in decades prior.
The quintessence of what makes Wes Anderson such a masterful film director: he makes magical worlds that seem real, in which marvelous characters say and do things that are both amazing and natural. There is a humanity in his magic. Even in the singular and esoteric diarama of his…ahem…design…we feel that this world could have existed, even if our only concrete reference is in one of his Touchstone Pictures.
Wes Anderson is as good at casting as anyone alive. From his leads down to his Sturgesesque touch with bit parts, he puts the right actor in the right role. Just look at Bob Balaban as the concierge of a European hotel, an actor who is a fastidious, uptight, funny little man. Bill Murray as a seafaring documentarian, the whole cast of the Belafonte, Michael Gambon everytime, Brian Cox in Rushmore, Royal Tenenbaum, the list goes on, and the actors deserve more credit than they get, bit this is the understanding when they get into the mess with Wes. You are all a part of an ensemble that becomes known under simply one banner. Even Anderson himself fades away, infusing every image, as opposed to feeling present behind the camera. The movies are so well made that they play like a train set he has built, not a montage of comedic and dramatic filmings he has spliced together over years.
Wes Anderson makes his films meticulously, yet they are so well cast and written, generously supported, and singularly envisioned. It feels that the triumphs are less due to the high stakes gamble of contemporary studio filmmaking, and more like it was according to some kind of, design.

Much ballyhoo is blogged and bluffed about Wes Anderson’s design. You have to say “design” like you are saying “Venus,” or “ethereal” to prove that you really read that one book. Anderson’s des-aye-enne, his writing, and his tonal style seem to get the most praise from the nascent Netflix and mkv. Cinephiles who were as lucky to get blessed with Wes as hip Americans were to get the Coens & Quentin & Jarmusch & Lynch & Linklater in decades prior.

The quintessence of what makes Wes Anderson such a masterful film director: he makes magical worlds that seem real, in which marvelous characters say and do things that are both amazing and natural. There is a humanity in his magic. Even in the singular and esoteric diarama of his…ahem…design…we feel that this world could have existed, even if our only concrete reference is in one of his Touchstone Pictures.

Wes Anderson is as good at casting as anyone alive. From his leads down to his Sturgesesque touch with bit parts, he puts the right actor in the right role. Just look at Bob Balaban as the concierge of a European hotel, an actor who is a fastidious, uptight, funny little man. Bill Murray as a seafaring documentarian, the whole cast of the Belafonte, Michael Gambon everytime, Brian Cox in Rushmore, Royal Tenenbaum, the list goes on, and the actors deserve more credit than they get, bit this is the understanding when they get into the mess with Wes. You are all a part of an ensemble that becomes known under simply one banner. Even Anderson himself fades away, infusing every image, as opposed to feeling present behind the camera. The movies are so well made that they play like a train set he has built, not a montage of comedic and dramatic filmings he has spliced together over years.

Wes Anderson makes his films meticulously, yet they are so well cast and written, generously supported, and singularly envisioned. It feels that the triumphs are less due to the high stakes gamble of contemporary studio filmmaking, and more like it was according to some kind of, design.

Some punchlines are funny simply because they have two incongruous pieces close together.

Very excited for the homies to come through Toronto with their wild rap juggernaut. I know I will begrudgingly leave my backpack at home, as I stare at my pre-smudged imitation Timbaland party boots.
hypebeast:

Dawn in East Harlem, 125th/Lexington. Check out more from the talented Vinoh.

hypebeast:

Dawn in East Harlem, 125th/Lexington. Check out more from the talented Vinoh.

(Source: ishootstreets.com)

Boom.

Boom.

(Source: kushandwizdom, via taintedluxe)

Hungover aka a hungy aka gover piled

Hungover aka a hungy aka gover piled

(Source: innertwist, via ihatetheclickingman)

"Know what I feel in winter, 80 degrees, deal with a winner"